Wednesday, June 6, 2012

I Dreamed A Dream

As you may or may not be aware I'm an avid reader. I'm the girl who reads the back of the shampoo bottle top to bottom, the one that reads all 4 sides of the cereal box while eating in the morning. I adore words.

Source


I used to be a user on Shelfari but have recently switched to Goodreads (mainly because, "there's an app for that"). When it came time to customize my profile I left it pretty vague. The one thing I did add was a goal. My 2012 goal is to read 50 books. (last year was 30, which I met and passed) 50 books doesn't seem like that many but when you look at them as a whole, or consider the time spent reading all 50, it's a lot of book time.

Although I gravitate towards mystery/suspense, vampire BS (yes,  said BS), memoirs and "chick lit" I've been adding classics to my reading list lately. Shamefully, I only became familiar with The Scarlet Letter after seeing Easy A. Still, I plan to read it. I want to read A Tale of Two Cities, The Picture of Dorian Gray, Jane Eyre and Interview With A Vampire.

I went to see Snow White & the Hunstman this weekend and one trailer in particular stood out to me. I knew the song playing but I couldn't place it. I just knew I'd heard that song before.



To be honest, I have no idea what Les Misérables is about. I know it's a classic and it's been on Broadway. I know I should have probably read it already, but I haven't. So, I need to remedy this. Fortunately for me, it's free for my Kindle and was  downloaded Monday as soon as I got home. Thanks to some Wikipedia "research" I'm vaguely familiar. For those of you who also haven't read it:
The novel contains many plots, but the main thread is the story of ex-convict, Jean Valjean (known by his prison number, 24601), who becomes a force for good in the world, but cannot escape his dark past. The novel is divided into five volumes, each volume divided into books, and subdivided into chapters (for a total of three hundred sixty-five chapters). Each chapter is relatively short, usually no longer than a few pages. Nevertheless, the novel as a whole is quite lengthy by modern standards, exceeding fourteen hundred pages in unabridged editions (1900 pages in French).
I feel compelled to read books before I see their film counterparts. Hollywood edits ruins changes everything and I don't want to operate under the assumption that the hollywood version is the correct version. Por ejemplo: I saw RENT the movie long before I ever saw the play. I'm forever tainted as I prefer the movie to the play.

Unfortunately the film isn't set for release until December, however, that gives me plenty of time to get through the 1400 pages (God bless Kindle!). I have a feeling this one may take a while.

14 comments :

  1. 50 books in one year will be quite a feat.  I don't read much any more but I used to a lot.  I would stay up all night reading.. it was so hard to put a book down!  The classics are my favourite - but I'm finding new books all the time that are really god as well. Right now I'm enjoying Bill Bryson's books - they're usually funny and always interesting. 

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  2. The crazy thing about the book being that many pages in French is they have fewer adjectives than in English. Did you read the hunger games? If you saw the films too I'd be curious to hear what you though. Oh, and some shampoo bottles have jokes on the back, which I rather like. 

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  3. That's an awesome goal! I can't seem to read anything of any value as of late. I try business books, philantrhropic overviews, ets... I always end up back at mind candy books that I can crank through and never think about again. I think I need to focus on quality! 

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  4. I actually had no idea what Les Mis was about myself, but it sounds pretty awesome really. Well, my kind of thing. I'm slowly becoming more of a reader again, which is good. I love books, and I still feel bad about all the time I spent not reading them. Interview and Dorian Gray are high on my "to read" list as well. Interview is vampires, but without the BS. 

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  5. Oh I'm all excited for Interview. It's the way vampires should be written about. Absolute classic. I've yet to see the movie as well. When I'm done...

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  6. A lot of the books I read don't rank high on the quality list.Reading is purely escape for me.

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  7. Read all 3 and saw the movie. I loved the books. I thought they were well writte and the characters were well established. As for the movie, I thought they did a good job condensing certain aspects for storytelling purposes (i.e. how Katniss got the mockingjay pin). I'm excited for the second one.

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  8. When I finish the book I started yesterday that will put me at 33 of 50.

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  9. WATCH THE MOVIE. LIKE RIGHT NOW.

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  10. I adore the book.  The thought that they're making (another!) movie out of the story makes me break out in hives.  No, I mean it makes me want to bite off my own tongue and choke on it.  And I loathe stupid Ann Hathaway.  The book is gorgeous!!!

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  11. Wasn't Claire Danes in one of the movies? This one looks good but this is also coming from the girl who's never read or seen it.

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  12. I am a bookophiliac as well so I am extremely impressed by your reader goals!  Good on you for reading "Les Mis" but I do have to warn you that it is one of the densest books I've ever read.  I nearly gave up.  You'll sail through though I'm sure. =)

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  13. CrazyTragicAlmostMagicJune 7, 2012 at 10:58 PM

    I'm not so sure. I started reading the other day and was overwhelmed already. I still want to try to get through it though. I have 6 months. I'm sure I can do that. I think!

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  14. I wouldn't worry about not reading the book: most people know it from the musical. The score is better than the book itself. YES, I SAID IT, BOOKSNOBS. One Day More? CHILLS. 


    In fact, I'd say most Les Mis fans are barely aware of the book. 
    That said, I have not "read" Les Misérables, I listened to it. It kept me company on a long drive to Pennsylvania and back again to Virginia. Kept me sane, kept me awake. However: the best part about reading a classic like Les Mis is that when you get bored (i.e. Victor Hugo talking about military/family history for what seems like EONS), you tune out. When the action kicks back in, you tune back in. It's not intentional. You just do it. It's an awesome  way of experiencing the classics without all the boredom.I'm rootin' for ya!

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