Monday, May 13, 2013

Pictures from the Past

Hey there!

I hope everyone had a good weekend!

Mine was... well, ugh.

Saturday I spent inside all day. I had visions of going to the gym or going outside but they were quickly replaced with the harsh reality that I have 2 5-page papers due on Tuesday... as in tomorrow. I did my best and ended up semi-finishing one of them. My focus just wasn't there. 

However, I did manage to get a little culture on Friday night.
I stayed in the city after work and went to the MoMA.
Friday nights admission is FREE from 4-8. 
Free. Me time. Nice night. I was all over it. 

First and foremost, I apologize for the shitty quality of these pictures. (#bloggerfail) Having a scratched camera lens is pretty much the worse thing to ever happen to an iPhone. Weep with me. I may have to go back soon with my camera just so I can snap some photos of quality. 

The False Mirror by René Magritte 1928 


Potrait of Joseph Roulin by van Gogh 1889
From the information on the wall this is 1 of 6 that van Gogh painted of his friend, a postal employee in Aries, France. 


Flag by Jasper Johns 1954-55

Girl with Ball by Roy Lichtenstein 1961
I'll have to go back for a cleaner version of this because you can't see any of the dots, which is part of what makes Lichtensteins so famous. 

Hide-and-Seek by Pavel Tchelitchew
1940-12
This was one of my absolute favorite pieces there. This was taken with my front camera, which is why it's not as bad as the others. There was a picture within a picture everywhere. For this alone, I'll go back with my camera. 


Jackson Pollock 
Why weren't my childhood art projects submitted to a museum? Why mom?! Look were I could be? I like this piece, I do, but it's just... how is this famous?


Seated Bather by Picasso 1930

Picasso is one of my favorites for all of his different styles, cubism, his blue period. It's abstract and that's what pulls me in. 

Fulang-Chang and I by Frida Kahlo 1937


What Is Painting by John Baldessari 1966-68
I really loved this piece. It makes so much sense and it reminded me of blogging. Some posts I read, they're just so moving. They make so much sense. Art isn't only a picture or painting. 

Still Life with Apples by Paul Cézanne, 1895-98
And one of my absolute favorites. It's actually the image on my credit card.  

The Starry Night

van Gogh 1889

From the wall:

""This morning I saw the country from my window a long time before sunrise, with nothing but the morning star, which looked very big", van Gogh wrote to his brother Theo from France. Rooted in imagination  and memory, The Starry Night embodies an inner, subjective expression of van Gogh's response to nature. In thick, sweeping brushstrokes, a flame-like cypress unites the churning sky and the quiet village below. The village was partially invented, and the church spire evokes van Gogh's native land, the Netherlands."


So what have we learned today?

Procrastination is a bitch. Free art is awesome.
Scratched iPhone lenses are the bane of my camera existence.

Any questions?




8 comments :

  1. I really love that last Van Gogh one, mostly thanks to Doctor Who really. It feels odd to say that.

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  2. Still great to see those, scratched lense of not.

    I'm a huge fan of cubism, and I love that Picasso painting. Maybe I'm just weird, but I can really appreciate the abstract.

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  3. Nice pics!

    xx

    http://unromanceconlamoda.blogspot.com/

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  4. I loved this! You're so lucky to have the MoMA AND the Met (and the Guggenheim, and..) -- and FREE, no less.In Boston, we have the MFA, so I'm hoping to take a trip there Memorial Day weekend (when it's FREE!)

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  5. Free? So jealous. I try to go to the DMA when it's reduced. It's only five bucks but still. What a great collection.

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  6. I love the flag and girl with the ball!! I love getting to do fun free stuff!!
    XO

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  7. Soo cool you saw starry night in person! I know nothing on nothing about art but I think I would freak out if I saw one of the really really famous paintings like that in person.

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